Skip to content. | Skip to navigation

Personal tools
Sections
You are here: Home topics EU defence
Document Actions

European Security and Defence Policy

Latest news about EU initiatives relating to a common security policy for Europe.

EC outlines plan to improve mobility within the EU
European leaders endorsed 170 initiatives last December known as the Stockholm Programme. The measures are aimed at creating a genuine European area of freedom, security and justice in the next five years. The Commission has now turned these political objectives into an action plan for 2010-2014.

Commission initiatives to bring more security to Europeans
European leaders endorsed 170 initiatives last December known as the Stockholm Programme, aimed at creating a genuine European area of freedom, security and justice. The Commission has now turned these political objectives into an action plan for 2010-2014.

Commission plan to deliver justice, freedom and security to citizens
European leaders endorsed 170 initiatives last December known as the Stockholm Programme. The measures are aimed at creating a genuine European area of freedom, security and justice in the next five years. The Commission has now turned these political objectives into an action plan for 2010-2014.

Commission acts to bolster citizens' protection and security
The European Commission today presented concrete actions – with set timetables – to boost citizens' ability to work, travel and study outside their home countries, thereby enhancing citizens' security.

External Borders Fund (2007-2013)
As part of the general programme “Solidarity and management of migration flows”, Decision No 574/2007/EC establishes the External Borders Fund (EBF) for the period 2007-13 with resources totalling €1820 million.

Recognition and execution of confiscation orders in the EU
The EU is facilitating the direct execution of confiscation orders for the proceeds of crime by establishing simplified procedures for recognition among Member States and rules for dividing confiscated property between the Member State issuing the confiscation order and the one executing it.

Policy Coherence for Development
When exploring ways to accelerate progress towards achieving Millennium Development Goals (MDG), the European Union (EU) considers how non-aid policies can assist developing countries in attaining the MDGs. The EU activity in this field is not only a key political commitment in the context of the MDGs, but also has a firm legal basis in the Treaty establishing the European Community (Article 178).

Security Standards of the EU
The attacks on 11 September showed that there is an unprecedented dimension to the terrorist threat which justifies the need for coherence in all cooperation efforts (banks, police, courts, etc.) and effective action. It has therefore been decided to introduce an EU security policy based on the legal instruments provided by the Treaty in order to give legal force to the rules and mechanisms for cooperation at EU level.

EU proposal for a new policy package on chemical, biological, radiological and nuclear (CBRN) security - briefing
The European Commission has today adopted a policy package on chemical, biological, radiological and nuclear (CBRN) security. The core of the package is an EU Action Plan on Countering CBRN Threats. The aim of the proposed policy is to strengthen the protection of EU citizens from these threats.

EU NAVFOR Somalia
Deeply concerned by the outbreak of acts of piracy and armed robbery off the Somali coast, the European Union launched military operation EU NAVFOR Somalia (operation "Atalanta"), which is conducted in support of UN Security Council Resolutions 1814 (2008), 1816 (2008), 1838 (2008) and 1846 (2008) in order to contribute to: the protection of vessels of the WFP (World Food Programme) delivering food aid to displaced persons in Somalia; the protection of vulnerable vessels cruising off the Somali coast, and the deterrence, prevention and repression of acts of piracy and armed robbery off the Somali coast.

EU naval operation against piracy - (EU NAVFOR Somalia - Operation ATALANTA)
Since 8 December 2008 the European Union has been conducting a military operation to help deter, prevent and repress acts of piracy and armed robbery off the coast of Somalia. This military operation, named EU NAVFOR Somalia - Operation ATALANTA, was launched in support of Resolutions 1814, 1816, 1838 and 1846 which were adopted in 2008 by the United Nations Security Council.

European Union Monitoring Mission (EUMM) in Georgia
The European Union Monitoring Mission (EUMM) in Georgia is an autonomous mission led by the EU under the European security and defence policy. Its objectives are to contribute to stability throughout Georgia and the surrounding region.

European Security Law
There have been a number of EU military operations in the last few years, evidence of a growing European military confidence, which in turn is a reflection of a developing competence in security matters. The creation of the European Union and its Common Foreign and Security Policy by the Maastricht Treaty of 1992 heralded this development, though the idea of a common defence can be traced to the beginnings of European integration. This book provides an analysis of the EU's evolving legal framework and powers on such matters, but it also recognizes that such a framework sits, sometimes uneasily, within the wider body of EU and International Law. The EU's security and defence policy also overlaps with those of other organizations such as the Organization for Security and Cooperation in Europe (OSCE), but more especially the North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO). EU relations with NATO have, in particular, caused some concern and are still evolving as both organizations seek to play a wider security role in the post-Cold War, and now post-9/11, era. With security now dominating political agendas at the domestic, regional, and international levels, it is no surprise that the EU's concern for security has grown apace, and, following the Union's respect for the rule of law, has been shaped legally as well as politically. This book evaluates the progress of the Union in this regard in its international context and in the wider context of European integration. The analysis is in the main a legal one, but is placed squarely within historical and political perspectives.

Geopolitics Reframed: Security and Identity in Europe's Eastern Enlargement (New Visions in Security)
This book traces the shifting meanings of security and geopolitics in Central European states that acceded into the EU or NATO in 2004. The author examines assumptions that shaped these debates and influenced policy-making, combining fresh theoretical approaches from international relations and political geography with rich empirical material from Central Europe. This book provides the first in-depth analysis of security discourse in the region.

Security and Defence Policy in the European Union
This major new text by a leading authority on European security provides a full assessment of the historical, political and systemic reasons behind the rise of the European Security and Defence Policy (ESDP). The author argues that the key issues involved - the challenges of defining a more balanced partnership between the two sides of the Atlantic and of transforming the EU from a civilian power into a new type of crisis management actor - are the most significant since the creation of NATO and the EU at the end of World War 2.

EU defence procurement - guide
The European Commission wants to introduce specific rules for procurement in the defence sector. These rules will be better suited to the specificities of the defence sector and will facilitate cross-border procurement of Member States. Up until now, the vast majority of defence procurement contracts have been exempted from the rules of the Single Market on the basis of Article 296 of the Treaty. This practice stands in contrast to the case law of the Court of Justice and hampers the openness of defence markets between Member States. The same problem exists, albeit less prominently, for sensitive non-military security equipment. One of the reasons for this is that current EU procurement rules, which apply also to defence and security procurement, are ill-suited to most defence and security equipment. In order to improve this situation, the Commission is now proposing a new Directive, tailor-made for defence and security. Member States will then have at their disposal Community rules they can apply to complex and sensitive procurements without putting at risk legitimate security interests. This will make the regulatory framework for defence more efficient and improve the openness of defence and security markets between Member States.

Cutting red tape in EU defence industry - guide
The European Commission wants to tackle obstacles to cross frontier trade in defence related products within the EU, thereby facilitating cross-border procurement of Member States’ armed forces and industrial cooperation in Europe. So far, the circulation of defence related products within the internal market is constrained by a web of heterogeneous and disproportionate national licensing procedures. By streamlining those procedures, today’s proposal will contribute to make European defence industries more competitive and improve conditions for Small and Medium Sized Enterprises' (SMEs) participation in armament development and production. In addition, it should enable Member States to meet military needs at lower cost and enhance security of supply for public procurement and industrial cooperation. To preserve the overall prevailing level of security interests’ protection, the facilitation of intra-EU transfers has been complemented by mutual confidence-building measures, notably guarantees for the protection of national security in case of re-exportation to third countries.

Security and Defence Policy in the European Union
This major new text by a leading authority on European security provides a full assessment of the historical, political and systemic reasons behind the rise of the European Security and Defence Policy (ESDP). The author argues that the key issues involved - the challenges of defining a more balanced partnership between the two sides of the Atlantic and of transforming the EU from a civilian power into a new type of crisis management actor - are the most significant since the creation of NATO and the EU at the end of World War 2.

European Defence Agency
The European Defence Agency was established under a Joint Action of the Council of Ministers on 12 July, 2004, "to support the Member States and the Council in their effort to improve European defence capabilities in the field of crisis management and to sustain the European Security and Defence Policy as it stands now and develops in the future".

European Defence Agency
The European Defence Agency has been created to help EU Member States develop their defence capabilities for crisis-management operations under the European Security and Defence Policy.